Seeing the chaotic mess of the public school system in New York City would lead Eva Moskowitz into a series of battles to reform that failing system. In an ideal world, her ideas and her story should serve as the textbook of what education should be for students, teachers, and society. A New York native and the daughter of teachers; she is passionate about education. Seeing the cracks in the public school system while understanding what students truly needed led her into the role of activist; which paired well with her stamina and resilience.

 

Eva Moskowitz could spell out problems and solutions to her bosses, but at the end of the day the real power to make any changes in this system is held by politicians.

 

Not one to shy away from a fight, she jumped into the political ring. A natural activist with a drive for justice, her ability to communicate with anyone makes her an effective politician and also a great teacher. While navigating the political minefields she founded Success Academy, a now prominent successful charter school. Methods are in play here that some consider unorthodox; such as acknowledging the importance of recess and play, and the game of chess as a life strategy crash course. The educational vision of Eva Moskowitz favors creative imagination, which then spills over into the core curriculum, which is being taught to students at an considerably advanced level. Students are coming away enriched and prepared for the professional and academic world, a considerable achievement, and one met outside of a public school system that is slow to change.

 

Further background on Ms. Moskowitz, and a more detailed look at her philosophies, methods, and curriculum used at Success Academy, can be read about here: http://www.philanthropyroundtable.org/topic/k_12_education/interview_with_eva_moskowitz

Her growing visibility is raising awareness of a vital issue. Taking her fight outside the system and achieving some dramatic results with students who in many cases the public schools would have failed and written off, is a wake up call to the educational bureaucracy, which is finally starting to take notice.